The Dublin Agreement 2019 To 2024

Dublin`s newly elected City Council has proposed the Dublin City Agreement 2019-2024, a series of commitments that will be reviewed twice a year and will cover, among other things, urban issues such as housing, environmental protection, climate protection, transport, arts and culture, accessibility and waste. As part of the proposals on art, heritage and sport, two points are relevant to our recent spotlight on Dublin`s nightlife and the Give Us The Night campaign. The agreement also has the effect of creating "5% cultural and creative community space" within the city. The Dublin agreement from 2019 to 2024 was presented earlier this month by Fianna Fáil, the Greens, Labour and the Social Democrats, who agreed on an electoral pact. "We appreciate the diversity, historical and creative character of Dublin City and believe that Dublin is full of unused cultural resources that could be fully exploited to improve the lives of all Dubliners," the opening of the agreement said. Mayor Paul McAuliffe received a letter from Chief Executive Owen Keegan calling the deal "very ambitious." The Dublin Agreement 2019-2024 is a five-year agreement between Dublin Green Party councillors, Fianna Fáil, Labour and the Social Democrats to draw up a plan for Dublin City. "However, no effort has been made to cost the various measures and develop a comprehensive financing plan. It seems to me that this is a serious weakness of the agreement that could undermine its credibility. Sinn Féin Cllr Daithí Doolan described the deal as an "expensive wish list" with no funding.

While the Dublin City Agreement attempts to make progress in cultural spaces, it does not mention anything about improving opening hours in Dublin City, which was an important goal for the Give Us The Night movement. He looks forward to working with the members of the monitoring group to ensure that the various measures are implemented to the extent possible. The Give Us The Night movement has lobbied the Council over the past decade to tackle these issues. Made up of people working in the Nightlife sector, the group of independent volunteers aims to improve licensing legislation in Ireland and combat the decline of the premises. It proposes a meeting "between the representatives of the control group" and "Senior Management" to discuss them. "I would certainly appreciate it if I had the opportunity to discuss with the group the issue of land disposal policy." Meanwhile, Mr Keegan said: "I would also warn against returning the powers of other agencies, as such an approach is not well accepted. and may make them less willing to cooperate with the Council. Many proposals need new legislation, he said. . . .